Uncommon Threads – Part II

As promised in my last post, Uncommon Threads – Part I

Here is part II of the art quilt exhibit, Uncommon Threads. Grab your cup of tea and get ready for your Wednesdayinspiration!

Yosemite Falls by Vicki DeMeter

 

White Daisy by Mary Beth Branca

 

Uehara Garden by Mary Anne Fitzgerald

 

Zen Bird by Suzi Dillinger

 

Turbulence by Margaret Winter

 

Sunset by Margaret Winter

 

Not Everything is Black and White by Mary Beth Branca

 

Of Space and Time by Mary Anne Fitzgerald

 

Portal of Yesterday by Virginia Standley

 

Sea Turtle by Suzi Dillinger

 

Stele Tears from Mardin by Ileana Soto

 

Double Delight by Margaret Winter

 

In the Garden by Mary Beth Branca

 

Ice Flower by Sue Harris

 

Heaven on Earth by Linda Pawlowicz

 

Habitat Under Fire by Ileana Soto

 

Grounded Angels by Linda Pawlowicz

 

Giant City in the Fall by Suzi Dillinger

 

Bliss by Pat Eyler

 

34 Pinecrest Ave. by Sue Harris

 

 

I hope you enjoyed these beauties as much as I did. Thank you, members of the The Creative Fiber Artists. Your work is beautiful!

 

Uncommon Threads – Finding Inspiration in a Recent Art Quilt Exhibit

A few weeks ago, I met friends for lunch and had the opportunity to see their wonderful works on display at the Village Theater & Art Gallery in Danville, Ca. They were part of an exhibition called Uncommon Thread,  whick featured unique art quilts created by a local quilting group, The Creative Fiber Artists. The quilts covered a wide range of topics and were interpreted in creative and imaginative ways. It was a great show.

I have become extremely interested in art quilting lately. This was an opportunity for me to enjoy a variety of mixed media and textile explorations which step out of the mainstream quilting style. I loved the show so much, that I took photos to share with our readers! I hope you enjoy these as much as I did. I, for one, am filing this under inspirational ideas!

 

Kadinsky in the Kitchen Study by Cyndy Rymer

 

Complimentary Colors by Pat Eyler

 

Aquatic Splendor by Vicki Demeter

 

Aquatic Splendor, close up by Vicki DeMeter

 

Asian Influence by Mary Beth Branca

 

Asian Influence close up by Mary Beth Branca

 

Circles, Circles, Circles by Sue Harris

 

Do Purple Cows Give Purple Milk? by Lynne Douglas

 

Enchanting Ella by Lynne Douglas

 

Global Alert, Artic Melt by Ileana Soto

 

Global Alert, Artic Melt close up by Ileana Soto

 

Gorgeous Gerty by Lynne Douglas

 

House of Whimsy by Pat Eyler

 

It’s 5 O’Clock by Virginia Standley

 

Lynne Douglas, The Great Escape

 

Lynne Douglas, The Great Escape, close up

 

Majestic Mt. Diable by Cyndy Rymer

 

Boundless Energy by Margaret Winter

 

Dancing in the Breeze by Margaret Winter

 

Dancing in the Breeze by Margaret Winter

 

Purple Haze by Cyndy Rymer

 

Rose Revisited by Vicki DeMeter

 

Rose Revisited, close up by Vicki DeMeter

 

Springtime in Vermont by Lynne Douglas

 

Thoughts of Japan, close up by Virginia Standley

 

Pretty awesome work, right? Stop in again on Wednesday and I will share the 2nd half of the quilts in this show.

Have a great week!

 

Designing with 20-Degree Fabric Wedges

Hi everyone! I just re-read Pati’s previous post (BTW don’t you just love her new work?!) and noticed in her last sentence  that she is curious as to what Darci and I have been up to. So, Pati, to answer your question, I will share with you and all of our readers what’s up here in Laura’s studio. I chuckle as I write this, as currently “my studio” is a very small section of my living space. Things have shifted a bit since the kids have moved back in with us. Let’s leave this for another discussion. All is well . . .it’s just an adjustment. I love having them here!

A few months ago I purchased a Kafffe Fassett Collective Fall 2016 20 piece Sweet Design Roll. The 6″ wide strips were the  perfect size for cutting fabric wedges with my new 20-degree wedge ruler.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-12-36-12-pm

My new class, 20-Degrees of Fabric play inspired me to make some new class samples.  Here’s the (almost) end result.

newwedgequilt

I say almost because, as you can see, I have not yet filled in the centers of the pieced hexagons. The obvious choice might be to appliqué circles. Instead, I decided to try cutting and fusing leaves from these beautiful fabrics, Maple Stream by Westminster Fibers.

leaves

I fused a green one to the hexagon in the upper right-hand corner just to see if I liked the look. The interesting thing is, my students saw it as a marijuana leaf! How funny, I didn’t see it. Oh well, I’m in California and decided I’m going to use them anyway. They are maple leaves . . . and I love them : )

While teaching the construction of this quilt,  I had an opportunity to discuss one of my favorite topics, grain line. Here’s a little tip that will help not only with this design but any other pattern that uses equilateral triangles (all sides being the same). The triangles are arranged as shown below and then joined together in horizontal rows.

straight-grain

Tip: In an equilateral triangle, there will be two sides cut on the bias and one side cut on the straight grain of the fabric. To prevent the rows from bowing and stretching, it is important to always place the side with the straight grain of the fabric even with the outer edge of the row (top or bottom). The other two sides of the triangle which contain the bias edges (lots of stretch) are in the center rather than along the outer edges. This is a simple detail but can save lots of grief during construction.

Thank  you all for your patience in announcing the winners of the fabric bundles from the giveaway in my last post. I will notify the following readers shortly to get shipping information.

Shirley Schmeyer – Batiks

Carol N – Benartex collection

Sandy A in St. Louis – French General

Until next time, happy creating everyone!

Laura Signature

 

 

 

Hitting the Reset Button at Craft Napa

It is a rainy, rainy week in Northern California. I see rainy days as a great time to hunker down, do some organizing, planning, scheduling, and catching up. That’s the agenda for my day. January is my wrap up month for unfinished projects. February finds me excited to plan out all the projects and ideas that have been brewing in my mind! On that subject, I thought I would share some of my creative goals for the upcoming year with you.

The short list: journaling, sketching and exploring ideas.

The long list: This one is a bit tougher. I am hoping to stop dragging my feet on a few big projects. Working on a book idea, entering more exhibits and getting more focused on lectures and workshops. Maybe if I put this out to the social media world, it will pressure me to make it happen!

One of my projects for the year has already began. I joined a group last September that would commit me to producing a 12″ x 12″ piece each month for 12 months. As a supportive group, we meet, we talk, and we encourage each other. I am so glad that I joined, but have not exactly been thrilled with my work after the first few months. My plan was to explore new techniques, textures, and alternative ways to manipulate fabric. All to be used later in larger pieces. To be honest, I haven’t been as worried about the finished 12 x 12 pieces, as much as where the explorations would lead me. As I said, things haven’t gone quite as well as I had planned, so I felt like I needed to hit the reset button.

So, I went off to Craft Napa 2017. (If you are not familiar with this event, I did a write up on this event last year, In Search of My Creative Spark.) It was perfect timing for me. I look at Craft Napa as an opportunity to explore new techniques in a week of creative play. I took some awesome classes this year and am now busy applying them to my 12 x 12’s, with much more success!

2017-02-09-17-31

My first workshop was with Jenny Lyon and machine quilting. It was a great class for me. I have taken many classes on machine quilting in the past, but the machines we used in the workshop were very similar to my new Bernina that I bought last year. This was a great chance to ask lots of questions, try some new stitches, and really get comfortable with the whole process. Jenny is a wonderful teacher. It was a great day.

2017-02-09-16-23

 

The next two days I spent with Judy Coates Perez. This brought a lot of “aha” moments for me! I had done a lot of fabric printing in college, and had wanted to be a fabric designer at one point in my life. But, this was the first time that I thought about taking advantage of these processes to create original work. Wow! It was so much fun!
2017-02-09-16

I even brought along some vintage lace to play with. I dyed the lace, then placed it on fabric to dry. I might have to go back and play with this idea a bit more.

After painting, stamping, scrunching and swirling for two days, I came home with some amazing, original fabrics that I can’t wait to cut up and sew back together! To be able to mix my own colors and create my own patterns was really eye opening to me. It is a great way for me to bring my love for drawing and painting into my quilts. I am so excited to get started. I have already bought a lot of the supplies and am planning to spend this year creating fabric to incorporate into my work.

2017-02-09-17

The big plus in all of this? I immediately started cutting up my samples and incorporating them into my 12 x 12 projects. They are now beginning to emerge into what I had envisioned. Thank you Judy Coates Perez, for opening my eyes to a whole arena that I have not explored since college. I think I am going to have a busy year full of exciting new projects!

Levanto, Italy

I have a mix of hand dyed fabric, along with a few solids and “Grunge”. I love the way the hand dyed fabric have a luminous glow to them.

Cinqueterra, Italy

Murano, Italy

Burano, Italy

As for other projects? I see more work playing with selvedges. I love the striated, line work that can comes from this technique. I have been playing with some images from a beautiful botanical book that my son gave me a few years ago. Who knows where this will lead.

2017-02-09-17

2017-02-09-17-35

I am also intrigued by pairing modern design elements to traditional and classic prints. I have been sketching out ways to get back to my Civil War reproductions, but in a more contemporary aesthetic.

I think it’s going to be a great year for me, creatively. As long as I don’t allow myself to get wrapped up in what I can and can’t do. Just do it! In my world, if I forever remind myself that it is the journey, not the end result, I am always happier with my finished product. And that, my friends, is what I love to share with you, the readers and my students! Enjoy the process and you will enjoy the end result.

I hope that you find inspiration in my plans for 2017. I wonder what Laura and Darci are up to?

Pati

 

 

A Look Back at a Year of Quilts

In past years, January has always been my catch up month. Not this year! I have been in a whirlwind since I shouted “Happy New Year!” a few weeks back. I have been on both a quilt retreat and an art retreat, met and spoke with 2 wonderful guilds at their monthly meetings, and then jumped on a plane to Mexico. As you are reading this, I am hoping to be causally sipping a margarita on a warm and sandy beach. Aaaah! Writing this post gives me a chance to reflect on the past year, and draw a few plans and goals together for me in 2017.

2016 was quite a year for me, with many firsts. I started the year out with a few days at Craft Napa 2016. I used the time to dig in to my creative side. I made a conscious effort to map out what was important to me, and permit myself to say no to anything that I had not enjoyed in the past year.

It was a great decision and made for a year of inspiration and adventures. I followed politics closer than I ever had before. I began speaking and teaching workshops to guilds. I was honored to be invited as the featured artist at a guild quilt show. I spent an inspirational month travelling in Italy. I made many new friends and reconnected with old friends. All in all, it was a glorious year. It is interesting for me to consider how my design work was influenced by my escapades.

give-me-liberty
Give Me Liberty

 

Give Me Liberty - close up
Give Me Liberty – close up

 

Finding My Way
Finding My Way

 

conversation-in-color
A Conversation in Color – Achoo! pattern

 

holiday-workshop-sample-beauty-shot
Holiday Table Topper – Workshop Sample

 

tweaking-tradition-close-up
Tweaking Traditions – Workshop Sample

 

safe-with-kaffe
Continuous Braid – Workshop Sample

This last quilt is an interactive quilt, designed to be a quilt version of the Subway Therapy Wall created in New York City. It is a work in progress.

Wall of Words
Wall of Words

Fabric “post its” are being added every day by friends, family (or anyone that wants to contribute) and will eventually cover the entire quilt. Heartfelt and positive thoughts, quotes and comments have become the overlying theme of this project. I have a stack of notes to add when I return home. If it gets too full, I will simply make another wall!

Wall of Words - close up
Wall of Words – close up


2017 is off to a great start in my little quilty world. I can’t wait to share those adventures with you! See you soon!

Pati

My year of quilts: 2016

I can hardly believe that it’s 2017. And that it’s almost February! Sometimes I feel like life has a fast forward button and things go by in a blink.

I found a few themes when looking through the work I did in 2016. One is that I didn’t finish very many quilts! The other is that one quilt commanded most of my time, and it was worth every minute I spent on it. I’ve always been a big fan of applique, but never liked the time it took to needle-turn applique. I still am sitting on one needle-turn project that I started 2 years ago on my honeymoon!

Enter the Dutch Darlings quilt pattern from Cristy Creates. I had seen it pop up on Instagram a few times and when she called for pattern testers I had to reach out.

dutchdarlings

I just love how it turned out. Here’s a closeup of the quilting: I did this on the longarm and loved playing with the negative space.

closeup_dd

Here’s my Meadow quilt (with a terrible photo) that finally got finished in 2016 also. This one lives at my mom’s house now. She saw it and loved it so I sent it home with her. I took the Meadow Quilt class from Lizzy House when I first moved to the Bay Area 4 years ago, and it sat in a little pile for years. Good thing quilting is not a sprint!

meadow

After all of the work on patterned quilts, I had to cleanse my pallet with a little improv. This first one is called Flower in a Square and I posted about it in on Darci Sews if you want to head over and read about it.

flowerinasquare

This purple quilt is the last finish of 2016 for me, and I challenged myself with this one. Purple is one of those colors that just doesn’t pull me, but I ended up with a lot of it in my solid stash so I gave it a go.

purple

I really like how the quilting on this one turned out. I tried to move out of the lines made by the piecing and make the quilting improv-style also. I like where it ended up, but think I could have pushed it a little further.

close_2

close_1

I’m sure I missed a few, and I also quilted lots of quilts for other people this year, so this just a sample of what I worked on last year. One of the goals I have this year is to document my finishes more! Joining the See How We Sew ladies surely will help with that. I’d love to hear about your 2017 quilty goals. What’s inspiring you?

Here’s to a prolific 2017!

darci

 

 

 

Laura’s Recap of 2016, Looking Ahead and a Giveaway!

calendar“tomorrow is always fresh with no mistakes in it”
― L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

 

 

 

Here we are, folks, it’s January!  Where did it go? In the blink of an eye, another year has passed. I’m ready for the new year, how about you? Are you feeling the same?

Before Pati, Darci and I jump in with new projects for 2017, we thought it would be fun to share with you some of the projects we worked on during 2016. You will be correct if you quickly notice a theme running through my projects. I suppose it was inevitable that when I learned there would be TWO grandbabies arriving in 2017, I would quickly begin making projects for their arrival. Not twins, in case you are wondering, but instead, both daughters are expecting . . . one in March and the other in June.

In no particular order, here are some of my projects. Interesting to note that only a few are quilting related. Looks like I did more knitting in 2016. Hmm, obviously I enjoy both.

socksAfter many attempts, I have finally been able to successfully knit a pair of socks. I’ve tried using both circular and double-pointed needles and find that the double points are easier for me. The best part of using this Heritage Print yarn by Cascade is that the interesting design is naturally formed simply by following your favorite sock pattern.

 

 

 

 

I used a Baby Cashmerino yarn by Debbie Bliss for this knitted blanket. I modified the free Treasured Heirloom Baby blanket a pattern by Lion Brand Yarn.  Since baby’s last name will be Berry I couldn’t resist making a strawberry cap using the “Kids Fruit Cap” pattern by Ann Norling.mollysknitted

 

berry-cap

 

If you are looking for a super quick and easy project for a baby gift, this Stretchy Carseat Cover by seekatesew.com is the perfect choice. A free downloadable pattern is found on the website. I used jersey knit fabric and since it was extra wide, I was able to make two covers. Not only are these covers, adorable fun to make, they also double as nursing aprons. Note: You can use either one or two fabrics, as I have done in my sample.

carseatcover

 

When my girls were young, I bought large pieces of foam, cut them into different shapes and then covered them with brightly colored corduroy fabrics. They played with them for years, stacking, jumping, making forts and just using to rest against while watching movies. This Christmas I decided to make a similar set for two of my favorite little guys. As you can see, they seem to be having a great time playing with them.

foamblocks

All four of my regular classes has an end of the year party. We each bring a yard of wrapped fabric for an exchange. Actually, it’s more like a stealing game as we pass the fabrics around trying to end up with our favorite one. This year I fell in love with these Darling Little Dickens Sheep fabrics by Lydia Nelson for Moda Fabrics. Unfortunately, I was not the lucky winner of the bundle, so I marched myself to my local shop the next day to purchase enough to make a small quilt. I’ll be sure to share photos as soon as it returns from the quilter.

sheepfabric

Here’s a sneak peek at the baby quilt I am working on. I am using both hand and machine piecing techniques, and thoroughly enjoying the process. In my next post, I would like to share with you some tips for drafting, cutting and piecing the shapes for this quilt.

baby-quilt

 

Giveaway

 

Finally, in an attempt to purge some of the way-too-many fabrics taking up space in my stash, I am offering a giveaway to three lucky readers. Note that there are three groups of fabric – left is French General, center is batiks and right is a collection of prints by Benartex fabrics. If you are interested in receiving one, simply leave me a comment by end of day January 15th, telling me which collection you prefer. The winners will be announced in the next post.

giveaway

 

 

Until next time,

Laura Signature

 

 

Quick and Easy Holiday Table Topper

A few weeks back, I traveled to my home town in Iowa to attend an annual fundraiser for my old high school. I get to spend 2 full days of quilting with talented quilters from my hometown. It is always fun and I love going! We usually offer a quick and easy project as a demo, including a few technique tips. This year, the goal was to create a holiday project, and tackling the subject of perfect points, mitered corners, machine quilting and bindings. Soooo. . .

beauty-shot

We showcased this holiday table topper. It was super easy and fun to make. I thought I would share it with you – just in case you needed to pull a quick holiday project out of your stash in the next few weeks.

I started with a great tutorial by Sewn Up/Teresa Down Under for a Disappearing Pinwheel Block. You can see the post and video here: Disappearing Pinwheel by Sewn Up, along with her beautiful sampler quilt and 11 variations created with simple little block!

I found some seriously-cute holiday fabric, referred to the video for the cutting instructions and made my first pinwheel. 
pinwheel-block Okay, that was easy. Now, let’s make a few more.

holiday-sampler-step-1

Now the magic happens – cut the pinwheel block into 9 equal sections, creating 9 smaller blocks.

holiday-sampler-step-2

Repeat with the other three blocks.

holiday-sampler-step-3

Switch, flip and rotate a few small blocks and watch those large pinwheels disappear!

holiday-sampler-step-4

Awesome, right? Let’s try another layout. . .

holiday-sampler-blocks

Since I am partial to the Churn Dash Block, this was the layout I chose. Each block measured 11″ unfinished.

holiday-sampler-top

I added a 5 1/2″ border with mitered corners to frame it out. In one short afternoon, I created a 30″ table topper for the holidays. Wow!


full-shot

This would be a great project for a table runner, placemats or an entire quilt. Here is one of the projects that was made at Quiltfest by a student. Same fabric line, but played with a little differently. I love the contrasts!

student-sample-2

Here’s a look at some of the other wonderful projects that were worked on over the weekend. So many great quilts!

picmonkey-collage

For our Bay Area readers – The new Bay Quilts quilt shop in Richmond, is having a meet the teachers event on Saturday, December 3 from 1-3. If you haven’t checked out this beautiful new shop, this is a great opportunity. Darci Read and I will be there chatting about the classes we are scheduled to teach in 2017. Stop by and say hello! There is also a wonderful 12 x 12 gallery show that will be on display at the shop. Be sure to check out The Power of 12 quilt show, that will be up through the end of the year.

Giveaway

And now – the Giveaway winner from last week’s post goes to Nance of idreamofquilting.com. Nance shared a simple, but really great tip:

“I always spray the top of the fabric and then flip it over and iron from the back. That way I don’t get any starch flakes on the top of the fabrics.”

There were lots of other great tips on ironing, so if you missed that post, take a moment and scroll through the comment sections. Thanks everyone!

Pati

Top Choices for Our Favorite Irons and a Giveaway!

The holidays are coming and we have received a few questions as to what our favorite iron is. Sounds like it may end up on a few holiday wish lists!

We thought it would be fun to share our different opinions on the subject of irons with you.

Laura:  I’m not sure I’m the best one to weigh in on this discussion because I’m a bit of a pessimist on this subject. But, I’ll throw my two cents into the pot, just because I want to be honest with you. I have not really loved an iron since my first one, a Rowenta, which I purchased about 35 years ago. I still have it and use it regularly in the classroom. It’s been a workhorse and has all the qualities I want in an iron – weight, good steam, no automatic turn off and definitely no leaking or spitting gunky brown liquid that will stain my fabric.

Over the years I have purchased probably 20 or more irons for both personal and classroom use, ranging in price from $20 to over $100. Truth be told, none of them has lived up to my expectations and as a result, I find myself buying a new one in less than a year.

I am currently using this Rowenta, and certainly not just because it is red!  It gets the job done but since I’ve never been excited about the automatic turn-off feature, this is a negative for me. It seems to take a bit too long to heat up and will turn off too quickly. I seem to spend to much time waiting for it to be ready. Perhaps I’m just impatient.

mainiron

One of my local quilt shops recently purchased  Reliable irons for the classroom. I had not used this brand but I have really enjoyed using them. They are heavy in weight and put out a lot of steam. I will certainly consider this brand the next time I am in need of a new iron. Unlike my other irons, this one suggests using distilled water. If you are not familiar with Reliable irons, I suggest reading some of the online reviews. I always find it helpful to listen to the advice of other quilters when it comes to the tools we regularly use.

reliableiron

It wouldn’t be fair to leave out my favorite small travel-type iron. This Rowenta is the perfect size for taking to class, I like how it fits in my hand and allows me to easily press small pieces; especially when preparing small fabric shapes for appliqué. I definitely use my main iron for the final stages of pressing but there is something about this iron that appeals to me when working with small shapes and/or pressing seams open.

traveliron

Pati: Like Laura, I have owned quite a few irons over the years. Some worked well, others were just not up to my needs and expectations. I owned quite a few Rowentas in a row because they performed so well. A few years back I was having trouble with my forearm muscle and decided to switch to an Oliso Smart Iron, thinking that it would help. I love it!

Oliso Steam Iron

My cheerful, yellow Oliso had Scorchguards technology, which actually lifts the iron off the board for you the moment you remove your hand. Which meant my arm got a much-needed rest. I have been very happy with the other functions of the iron, also. It heats up quickly, even after the automatic turnoff. It works well with dry heat, and the steam settings are spot on. I especially like the steam blast button to get the creases out of folded fabric.
oliso-closeup

One of my favorite features of my Oliso is the way you add water. I have always spilled or over-filled when adding water. This iron is almost spill proof when you use the companion water pitcher that comes with the iron. No more saturated ironing boards in my sewing room!

I want to also add that Darci and I both had a chance to use the Reliable Iron that Laura mentioned above, while at a retreat last weekend. I thought it was really great. It had great heat, lots of steam and I really liked the feel of the iron.

Darci: I grew up using my mom’s old Black and Decker classic iron. That thing always came through, so much so that we used it for 25+ years. When I started quilting, I was pleased to see that Black and Decker re-released their classic iron, now with updated technology. I had one that lasted a few years but then conked out. So I bought another, and that one failed after a few months. Enter: my cordless iron from Panasonic.

I have a really old vintage iron that’s pre-electricity also, I thought that was a funny comparison to how far we’ve come with our tech. My two cordless irons.

thanandnow

The Panasonic NI-L70SR has a retractable cord along with a heat-resistant cover which makes it a great traveler. I brought it to our East Bay Modern Quilters Retreat this weekend, and it got non-stop use for 3 days. At the end of the weekend, I unplugged it and put it right in my car without having to wait for it to cool down.

I love how there’s no cord to get tangled up in. When I’m ironing larger items, I just make sure to put it on the base frequently so it doesn’t lose its heat. I haven’t had too much of a problem with that, it seems to hold its heat just fine. I love the stainless steel plate also. I just finished a large appliqué project that involved lots of glue and heat setting, and the plate never got gluey. My only complaint is that the water chamber is small, but since it’s detachable, you can take just that part over to fill it up. It gives me the excuse to get a few more steps in.

upright

Hope this answers a few of our readers’ questions. If you need a few quilters tips on how to properly iron, or clean your iron, check out these links:

How to Press Quilt Seams – A Free Craftsy Tutorial

How to Press a Quilt Block Flat – This is a great trick by Generations Quilt Pattern

Accurate Pressing – Quilting.about.com

Cleaning Your Iron with a Dryer Sheet – ApartmentTherapy.com

If you love DIY, then here is a recipe for the spray starch alternative we all love.

Spray Starch Alternative Recipe

In a large container, mix together:

24 oz distilled water

3 oz. vodka

1 tsp scented essential oil (optional) Love the fresh linen and lavender scents.

You may also add one drop of food color per gallon if you like.

Pour into spray bottle, give a good shake and your ready to press.

Giveaway

 

And for our giveaway – Share your favorite trick or advice with us and we will choose one lucky reader to win a free gift to use with all of your new ironing tips we have shared.

 

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and see you all next week!

laura-pati-and-darci