100 Quilt Blocks in 50 Days!

Janome and Michael Miller Fabrics have teamed up with a really fun project we would like to share with you. 100 Blocks in 50 Days.
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Laura and I were asked to design some blocks for this project a few months ago. The blocks were to be made from a selection of 10 scrumptious colors from one of my favorite fabric lines, Cotton Couture by Micheal Miller. 100 blocks total, were created by quilters from 40 different states and 5 different countries. The blocks were then assembled and presented at Quilt Market in Houston last week in this stunning quilt. Isn’t it amazing?

100qb So, this is where you come in . . .

All of these wonderful blocks are now being released, two at a time, on Janome’s blog, along with FREE downloadable instructions for each block! There is also a link for you to check out who the designer is.  Every weekeday beginning on October 19th going through December 25th  two new blocks have, and will, be released. How cool is that? It’s not too late to sign up to have the remaining blocks delivered to your email box every morning – Sign up here100quilt-blocks-3

If you want to catch up on the blocks already released, you can find them at 100 Quilt Blocks Downloads or follow along on Michael Miller’s Pinterest Board – 100 Blocks in 50 Days. Laura and my blocks will be released on November 9th, December 16th, 17th and 22nd. We will post a little info on how we created these blocks  on the days they are released. So, stay tuned!

Interested in making the quilt? I sure am!

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This Cotton Couture fabric bundle just happens to be the right amount of each color to make all 100 of the blocks. It is available to purchase at any Authorized Janome Dealer.

And – there are some opportunities to win some cool prizes.

Submit photos for a chance to win a Horizon Memory Craft 8900QCP Special Edition

Share on Instagram with #100quiltblocks

I feel like an infomercial, but . . . Wait! there’s more!

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Whew! I am exhausted – that’s a lot of info!

I am going to finish up by mentioning that Carol Van Zandt has been busy photographing the beautiful quilts at Houston Quilt Market last week. I think I will take a little time to enjoy her wonderful photos here. You should too!

Have a great week!Pati

Tumbling Diamonds Block – Improvisational (Re)Design – Part 3

Untitled-1I hope you have been following the past few weeks with See How We Sew, as we continue to explore quilt block design. Laura passed the baton on to me this week to see what I would do with the Tumbling Diamond Block that she found in one of her old favorite quilt books, The Quilters"Tumbling Diamonds" quilt featured in the book, The Quilters.

Before getting started – can we just take a moment to appreciate Laura’s knowledge and instruction in her posts the past 2 weeks? I learned so much! I hope you did too! And what about the cool design created when she used the mirror to show her block in repeat? Just saying . . . it was a real eye opener for me. If you missed her posts, take a moment to go back and catch up on all the fun:

Introduction Video

Drafting a Tumbling Diamond Quilt Block

Constructing a Tumbling Diamond Quilt Block

I loved the fabrics Laura chose for this challenge. But, I was drawn to the very minimalist block in the second row of the inspiration quilt. So, I decided to add solid white to the combination to help achieve that same feel.FabricI guess you could call today’s blog post, Tumbling Diamonds Part 3, The Sequel, or maybe even Technical Block Design Goes Rogue. I began as I often do – by cutting and sewing a few curves, kind of like a little bit of warm up to get me started. If you are interested in learning this technique, check out our video, Cutting and Sewing Curves Tutorial.

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I followed Steps 2 and 3 of Laura’s instructions to construct my diamonds. By adding the curved strips, my diamonds took on a life of their own, though. I see this as a good thing – I want to focus on movement and a whole lot of wonky direction.

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I knew that the block needed to be completely improvisational to obtain this. My challenge was, how to keep the free form construction when the original block had so many angles and y seams? It just wasn’t as obvious to me as deconstructing a Nine Patch or Log Cabin would be. I decided that the answer was to construct my block in three respective rows, which would allow plenty of room to emphasize those wonky angles to my diamonds.

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Once I created my three rows, the next step was to attach them. Remember my warm-up excercise? I went back to cutting more curves, this time, the angles of the diamonds dictated the shape of my curve.  This made it fairly simple to attach the three rows.

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Because of all the random angles and curves I added into the block, it definitely did not end up square at this point.
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Adding a border to square up my block was an option. I simply relied on curved piecing again to accomplish this step.2015-09-24 18.47.02

The busy print added a lot of movement, but the border was not exactly what I had in mind.  This is where I went a little rogue. I wanted to think outside of the box on this re-design and here it is. . .2015-10-16 09.14.01

Why not trim the busy print down to 1/2″, then turn it under to look almost like a binding? Just enough to show a peak of the busy lines in the fabric.

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Then finish as an applique block with a background block. By doing this, the block takes on a totally different look, depending on the background choice. It also keeps the wonky movement that I was trying to achieve. Which one do you think works the best? Leave a comment and let me know!

Untitled-1

That was fun, Laura!  I guess I need to come up with a challenge to hand off to you next time.

In the mean time, Carol Van Zandt has had her camera out and taking photos of all the wonderful quilt events that have been happening in our area. We will be sharing the links over the next few weeks. Be sure to check out her blog, The Plaid Portico for a lovely photo post Freddy Moran at Quilting in the Garden.

Have a great week and keep on quilting!

Pati

Tips for Constructing a Tumbling Diamonds Quilt Block – Part 2

FinaleditIn my last post, I shared some tips for drafting and cutting pieces for a Tumbling Diamonds quilt block. As some of you suggested in the comments, it may have been easier to paper-piece this pattern. This may certainly be the case, for those of you who enjoy paper piecing. You will however, need to start with the drafted pattern and then cut into sections required for paper piecing. For those of you, like myself, who like traditional piecing, I am including some tips for construction of this block. the more I work and play with it, the more I just love it. I can see it in many fabric and design options.

Here’s the block, now let’s get started.

Tumbling Diamonds quilt block
Tumbling Diamonds quilt block.

If you missed my previous post and would like to follow along, click here to get all of the cutting instructions.

Step One: Sew the A-1 and A-2 strips together lengthwise. To avoid waste when cutting, offset the strips 2″, as shown.

Offset Fabric strips A-1 & A-2.
Offset Fabric strips A-1 & A-2.

Step 2: Use the 45-degree angle marking on your ruler to cut diamond units. The cut width of the units is the same measurement used to cut the individual strips. The photo shows a 2″ wide cut.

diamonds1

diamonds2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Place the diamond units exactly as shown, and then use pins to secure at the center and near the ends. Be consistent with the placement of the fabrics in all four pieced diamond units. In my sample, the navy fabric is always at the ends. Sew two units together. It is important to note that the stitching line begins and ends where the two units touch. Press the seam first on the wrong and then right side to complete the pieced diamond.

 

diamonds6JPG

 

Step 4: Sew the pieced diamonds to the fabric B triangles. Note the exact placement of the pieces when stitching, as there should be extensions on both ends.

diamonds5

 

Step 5: Sew the new units to the fabric C center square. It is important to begin and end the stitching line 1/4″ from the edge of the C square, as shown and indicated by the pencil line on the fabric. Take a few backstitches at the beginning and end to secure the stitches. Repeat with all four sides.

Centersquare

 

Step 6: The final block construction joins the side pieces at the corners….yeah, y-seams!! The most important thing to remember in this construction is to never stitch beyond the 1/4″ lines, as shown.

yseam2

 

Step 7: Give your completed block a final press, first on the wrong and then right side.

Let’s look at some design options for this block. 

Without having to make multiple blocks, you can preview what four will look like together. Often times, the secondary designs formed where blocks are joined can be just as interesting or perhaps even more so that the original block. I used two mirror squares that are taped together to form a hinge. I am just loving this block and plan to play with more colors and fabric options.

 

Two mirrors joined together.
Two mirrors joined together.

 

4block mirror

 

Here’s what the block looks like if side triangles are added. An alternate block is created joining them together. I think it would be fun to use a variety of fabrics for the corner triangles.

Side triangles form the look of alternate blocks.
Side triangles form the look of alternate blocks.

 

I think I need to play more with this block. I hope you might feel the same. Up next, Pati will share her interpretation of this blocks, using the same fabrics. I can’t wait to see what she comes up with. Be sure to join us.

In the meantime, happy creating everyone!

Laura Signature

Problem Solving Tips for Drafting a Tumbling Diamonds Quilt Block – Part 1

Hello Readers,

In my last post, I included  a short video that Pati and I recently made.  In the video I suggest to Pati that we share with you some of the steps we each use in designing our quilts. I looked through the very first quilting book I ever purchased, “The Quilters” by Patricia Cooper and Norma Bradley Buferd and was intrigued by an image of the quilt labeled as “Tumbling Diamonds”. The credit indicates the quilt is from Texas around 1910 and in the Cooper and Buferd Collection. I suggested to Pati that we use this pattern and challenge ourselves to make blocks using some current fabrics.

"Tumbling Diamonds" quilt featured in the book, The Quilters.
“Tumbling Diamonds” quilt featured in the book, The Quilters.

Here are the 5 new fabrics that I selected for our projects. Since I failed to include the names of the fabric manufacturers and designers on the video, I am adding them here, just in case you are interested in adding some of these beauties to your stash.

Fabric

  1. White multi-print – “London Calling” (Spice) by Robert Kaufman
  2. Black floral – “London Calling” (orchid) by Robert Kaufman
  3. Pink with bowls – “Zephyr” by Rashida Coleman Hale for Cotton and Steel
  4. Green/Yellow geometric – “Birch Farm – Chicken Coop” by Joel Dewberry for Free Spirit
  5. Navy with letters – “Playful” by Melody Miller for Cotton and Steel

Often we find patterns or inspiration in a book, magazine or an online source. Making a traditional pieced block without a pattern or instructions can be a bit challenging. It’s nice to at least have a starting point so I consulted my two usual resource books.  I was not successful in finding this exact block. I did however, find one in Jinny Beyer’s book that is very close. It is called “Roads to Berlin” and listed under the 4-patch category of blocks. I could easily draft a block similar to Tumbling Diamonds using the diagram shown. But my stubborn self likes a challenge so I decide to attempt drafting it as close to the original as possible Note that the diamonds are both long and not pieced, as shown in the quilt pattern.

Block&grid

In this post I will share with you how I drafted the Tumbling Diamonds block and then determined the cutting sizes of the fabric shapes. My next post will include tips on block construction as well as some fun setting options. I hope you might be tempted and inspired to play along and make one for yourself.

"Tumbling Diamonds"
“Tumbling Diamonds”

I did play with this pattern on graph paper, but found the sizes to be challenging, especially when working with the pieced diamonds. So, rather than working in the traditional way of marking a finished size block onto graph paper and then filling in the shapes, I decided to start by drafting the pieced diamonds and build from there to complete the block. This is definitely not my usual way, but it worked great for this block and I too learned something along the way.

My goal was to both use easy to cut measurements and strip-piece the two fabrics together that are used for the diamonds. I randomly decided to make make each small diamond 1″ finished, and started the drafting process, as shown. I know that many of you skilled with design programs can do this much quicker and easier than this, but I’m one of those old-school girl types! I enjoy working with graph paper and pencil. Either way, I hope you might give this a try.

Step One: Mark a corner of the block, then a 45-degree angle line from the corner into the center. Finally, mark two parallel lines, 1″ apart, as shown.

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Step Two: Mark two additional diagonal lines, as shown. This completes one pieced diamond.

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Step Three: Use the 45-degree marking on your ruler to add more lines, as shown. These lines determine the finished size of the quilt block. This one is 6-7/8″ x 6-7/8″.

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Step Four: Refer to the photos to continue marking lines to complete the shapes in this block.

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Step Five: This photo includes all the markings needed to define the shapes in the block. The shapes are labeled, A, B & C and cutting measurements included. Note that the A diamonds are labeled 1 & @ to indicate that two fabrics are used.

Finaledit

 

 

Here’s an easy reference chart for cutting fabric shapes to make one Tumbling Diamonds block. I am also including cutting measurements for a 10-3/8″ finished block, just in case you are interested in making a larger block but want to avoid the drafting process ; ). Get your fabrics out and start cutting. I know you will enjoy the process.

Cutting:

To make one 6-7/8″ x 6-7/8″ finished block

A-1 & A-2: One 1-1/2″ x 42″ strip, from each of two fabrics

B: One 5-1/4″ square. Cut the square twice, into quarters diagonally.

C: One 3-3/8″ square

 

To make one 10-3/8″ x 10-3/8″ finished block

A-1 & A-2: One 2″ x 42″ strip, from each of two fabrics

B: One 7-1/4″ square. Cut the square twice, into quarters diagonally.

C: One 4-7/8″ square.

Be sure to check back as my next post will include helpful hints for construction and setting options. Following that, Pati will share her block using the same inspiration pattern and fabrics. I can’t wait to see what she comes up with, and hope you will feel the same.

Enjoy!

Laura Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Tutorial Series Launches at SHWS: Inspiration and Helpful Tips for Quilters

Pati and I are excited to share with you our first, of hopefully many video tutorials. In keeping with our blog name, we want you to actually “see” how we work with fabric, color, design and inspiration. Please check back with us as we have fun sharing our teaching tips on many subjects.

 

Take care everyone and enjoy!

Laura Signature

 

 

 

2015 Quilting in the Garden with Freddy Moran and Sally Collins

We have had a bit of a delay in getting our video up and running this week. Fingers crossed it will be ready for viewing next week. In the meantime, I want to share with you two exciting events happening in our area. In an effort to provide those of you not able to attend these shows with some beautiful images, I am attaching a link to Carol van Zandt’s blog. Carol, as you may know, is our roving photographer and captures some beautiful images from the many quilt shows and events she attends. Please enjoy Carol’s post, Kawandi Adventure: Quilts by Margaret Fabrizio.

2015 QUILTING IN THE GARDEN – September 26 & 27 at Alden Lane Nursery, Livermore, CA

Visit with Freddy Moran at Alden Lane, Sept 26 & 27th.

Sally Collins, guest artist at 2015 Quilting in the Garden.
Sally Collins, guest artist at 2015 Quilting in the Garden.
 

Alex Anderson
Those of you in the San Francisco Bay Area, please remember to join featured artist, Freddy Moran, guest artist, Sally Collins and our local celebrity Alex Anderson at Quilting in the Garden at Alden Lane Nursery in Livermore. The show runs from 9-4 on Saturday and Sunday, September 26th and 27th. The beautiful old majestic oak trees  provide the perfect quilt hangers for hundreds of original works of art.

Places-J: Quilting in the Garden 2012

 

Yo-Yos & Half Squares: Contemporary Quilts

The Oakland Museum of California is featuring the special exhibit, Yo-Yos & Half Squares: Contemporary Quilts. The show runs until February 21st so you have plenty of time to plan your visit.  If you enjoy Off the Grid food trucks, music and more, consider joining the museum every Friday night. There is a special half-price gallery admission for adults and ages 18 and under are free!

With Fall in the air, it’s a perfect time for enjoying quilts … but in my world, that would be every day!

Laura Signature

 

A Peek Into Our Busy Week

It’s been another busy week here at SHWS. Pati and I are away teaching her Winter Brrd House quilt at one of our local guilds. I can’t help sharing this photo of us getting the car ready for our trip. We both had to laugh at the amount of stuff needed for a one day workshop and trunk show. Believe me, it was far easier getting the suitcases into the car than it was stuffing the quilts into the suitcases ; )

Hoping it will all fit!
Hoping it will all fit!

I’ve never been one to take photos of restaurants and my food, but I just couldn’t help myself when we happened upon this little gem of a restaurant in Morgan Hill (called Josephine’s Bakery for you locals!). We walked in the front door and immediately felt at home, and not just because of the delicious bakery smells coming from the kitchen. Isn’t this the most inviting and adorable little breakfast place?

Josephines1

Our breakfasts were divine! Yes, that’s a homemade apricot scone with homemade jams. We were in heaven.

Josephines2

All in all, we had a wonderful day, teaching a group of lovely women in the guild to “embrace their curves” (Pati’s words) while making birdhouses. Ahh, teaching, I love it. To see more photos from our trip, please check out both our Facebook and Instagram pages. We’d love to have you as followers.

Pati is away on retreat but has asked me to pass along the following message regarding the pattern giveaway in her last post.

Here’s Pati:

“Everyone Wins! I was so inspired by all the wonderful ideas left in the comment section of last weeks’ post on A New Pattern and A Giveaway. If you haven’t had a chance to read them, take a moment – you will be so glad you did! It was hard to choose a winner, but, Kathy R. shared such a lovely idea, that I knew she needs to make this quilt! Congratulations Kathy! I will be contacting you to get a mailing address.

And for all the other wonderful comments and ideas, as a thank you, I am offering my Winter Brrrd Houses pattern for $7.99 for one week only. Visit my Etsy Shop today to get yours! And please, please, please, share a photo with me when your project is complete. I have started an Inspiration Page on my website to share projects made from my new pattern line. Keep sewing!”

Since we’re on the subject of “peeking”, I’ll give you a quick look into what’s ahead at SHWS. I can only tell you at this time that it involves a video and some new tutorials. The first one is inspired by the following book and fabrics.

The first quilt book I ever purchased. Still offers me wonderful inspiration.
The first quilt book I ever purchased. Still offers me wonderful inspiration.

 

I can't wait to start playing with these new fabrics.
I can’t wait to start playing with these new fabrics.

 

Please stay tuned and hope to see you back here soon at SHWS.

Laura Signature

 

 

A New Quilt Pattern and a Giveaway

File Sep 11, 8 14 52 AMCalifornia is in the middle of a heat wave this week. The timing seems really odd to be announcing a new quilt pattern called Winter Brrrd Houses. But that is what I am doing! Winter Brrrd Houses is here, and now available through my Etsy shop and will be on our SHWS Pattern Page. And to celebrate, we are giving away a free pattern today!

WinterBrrrd Houses Pattern by Pati Fried
Winter Brrrd Houses has something for everyone. The pattern mixes piecing, improvisational curves, applique and a little bit of embroidery. Trust me, you will not get bored from making the same block over and over again with this project. I made 30 birdhouses from the start of the quilt to the completion of the pattern. Each one had its own personality. It was so much fun choosing the fabrics and sizes, that I could just keep on going!

The pattern is designed to give you oodles of options to add your own unique spin on the project. The quilt and the pattern have my name on it, but I will be the first to tell you – Laura was a huge part of writing this pattern. We all know that writing a pattern with solid technical instructions is tough. Choosing to include improvisational design options made it twice the challenge. I am so grateful to have had Laura’s expertise along the way.

Winter Brrrd Houses by Pati Fried

Last week, I gave a peek of the sample that Laura and I put together at our sew day. I’m excited to say I just received a few photos from Kerry Reed, who has been busy quilting for me and sent some teasers while working away. This is the Spring version of the quilt. Same technique, just different fabric choices and layout. Remember, I mentioned oodles of design options? Spring Bird Houses by See How We Sew

Laura and I are teaching a birdhouse workshop to the Piece by Piece Quilters of Morgan Hill, Ca. next week. It will be fun to team teach this project now, after working so hard together to complete the pattern.
Indigo Bird Houses close up by Pati FriedAbout a week ago, I tried making two more versions. The first time, I followed the pattern exactly, with not a stitch of improv in sight. I even omitted the curve piecing. Ok, I did decide to change the birdhouse doors a bit. I also used some of my cherished indigo fabrics to punch it up. Simple, quick and still lots of fun to make.Indigo Bird Houses by Pati Fried

In the second version, I threw all the rules out the window except for the cutting instructions for the roofs. I wanted to see what would happen if I sized the houses differently. How would it look if my points were off?

french-house-close-up

I also over sized the background sections, to give me a chance to play with the layout. The curve piecing was a natural fit at this point – I was just filling in the blanks. At some point it became a little French city, not a flurry of birdhouses. And can we just take a moment to notice the quilting?
French Houses by Pati FriedSo there you have it. Four versions of what can be done with one pattern. My hope is that a few of our readers will take my lead and create their own unique designs, using the tips and techniques shared in the pattern. In fact . . .

Web

leave a comment on what your version might be like – and I will choose a winner to receive a free pattern!

Have a great weekend!

Pati

A Quilters Favorite Pincushion

 Pincushion

pin·cush·ion;     pinˌko͝oSHən;     noun – a small cushion into which pins are stuck for convenient storage.

So this is about as small as it gets. I love this little guy. I tuck it into my bag for travel to classes or handwork on the go. Pincushions have come a long way since the red tomato version that I remember sitting next to my mom’s Singer sewing machine in the 60’s.

georgias-home-inspirations.blogspot.com
Photo from Georgia’s Home Inspirations.

I got this idea a few weeks ago to do a story on quilter’s favorite pincushions. Would they match the quilters’ personality? We all have our personal favorite. That one that you grab first. The one that has been with you through your trials and tribulations of quilting. So I put the word out on Facebook,  Instagram and in my drop-in class for everyone to share their favorite pincushions with me. I have collected quite an assortment to share with you!

The tomato pincushion will always be a classic among sewists. It just happens to have a bit more personality today.

PicMonkey Collage

Top left to right:

SHWS emeritus, Jennifer Rounds wrote about these lovely Heirloom Tomato Pincushions in a past blog post. Which, just happens to come with a free pattern on our Pattern Page.

Catherine Jarrett sports a green tomato in my drop-in class. I am pretty sure this one has helped with some show-stopping- quilts. If you are on Instagram, you can see one of Catherine’s quilts featured in a recent Quiltmania issue here.

Fern Royce, from Textile Mavens sent this snapshot to me. Love the colors and fabrics of this. It just reminds me of Fern and her wonderful quilts.
How about a colorful version, by none other than the talented longarmer, Kerry Reed? Check out some of her beautiful work on her facebook page here.
Some quilters get more excited about beverages than vegetables, (ahem – tea cups vs tomatoes, get it?).
Top left to right:
Pam Petsas brought this Victorian jewel to our Indie Modern Quilters meeting. Such a fashionista!
Kerry Reed, shared another pincushion that her sister gave to her 10 years ago. How many quilts do you think this lil’ teapot has seen quilted in it’s time? Oh, if only it could talk. . . .
Rosemary Patterson – OMG, if you know Rosemary, you know this is perfect for her – fun and full of spunk!
Kristen Takakawa, of The Needies  has a pincushion made by her sister in law, using a sake cup as the base. Kristen says the weight of the cup always keeps it right where she wants it.
And then there is the “form follows function” category, still managing to slip in some creativity. Pincushions with storage – how smart is that?
Left to right:
The talented, Linda Harding keeps Frida close at hand for toting tiny tools.
And my friend, Chancy Fessler snapped a photo of the cushion of choice for Ben Venom while he taught a workshop at San Jose Quilt Museum.
My personal favorites, the wool versions. . .
Left to right:
Laura Nownes, of course with no less than a ladybug! This one is a real cutie!
Longtime friend of SHWS, Diana McClun has a wooly treasure. I love this one. Maybe because it is always out and in use in her studio when I visit.
Moving on to pieced with perfection . . .
Top left to right:
Kim Buteau, of Etsy’s Zombie and Posies totes this sweetheart to class with her. I challenge you to find anything else pink in her shop!
And for perfect points, we have Rita of Mochi Studios‘s little gem!
These last two were shared by my new Instagram buddy, Cyndi Murdoch of JackcynRedesign.com. She wrote a sweet post about A Quilting Afternoon, you might like to read.
Speaking of sweet. . .
PicMonkey Collage 6
Left to right:
Margaret Glendening of Etsy’s MGmade, uses a pincushion her daughter made in Kindergarten.
Art quilter, Pauline Pearsall has a lovely lace number to hold her pins. Check out one of Pauline’s amazing quilts at Pattsart.com
And we have to have an animal section, now don’t we?
PicMonkey Collage 5
Left to right:
This busy little turtle was found sitting on the worktable at Oakland’s A Verb for Keeping Warm. It was sitting right next to their new book!
And let’s end with Terri Carpenter of The Quilted Fox, who shared her adorable little mouse..
So after seeing all these creative pincushions, I noticed that I  have quite an odd collection poking around my own sewing room.PicMonkey Collage
I don’t even think the turtle was made for a pin cushion, but it works great for one! The red one holds my machine needles, when I am not quite ready to retire them.
Ceremony 2Which reminds me of one of the first posts I wrote on SHWS, about Hari-Kuyo, a lovely Japanese ceremony for retiring old and  broken sewing needles. It is such a lovely tradition. You can read about it here.

PicMonkey Collage 7

To end this story, I am going to be quite honest. Usually when at home, I use my trusty metal bowl. I like that in a quilting frenzy, which I am often in, I can actually toss the pins and the magnet just pulls them on home. Second in command would be my beloved pincushion/threadcatcher I made a few years ago. These are definitely my tools of choice.

So how’s that for a pincushion extravaganza? I hope you enjoyed it. I know I totally enjoyed seeing how my friends express their personality this humble little tool. Want to share your favorite pincushion? Tag me on Facebook or Instagram and #favoritepincushion to be a part of the collection. I would love to keep it growing!

See you soon!

Pati